Celebrating ‘Explore Your Archive’ Week

This week is Explore Your Archive week – a brilliant opportunity to exhibit the unique potential of archives to excite and intrigue people, bring communities together, and share amazing stories.

In celebration of Explore Your Archive week, which is supported by the The National Archives and the Archives and Records Association (ARA), we thought it would be interesting to share our pick of Archives that are pioneering the way in preserving digital content for use by future generations, as well as making it more accessible today.

Here is our pick:

Suffolk Record Office

The Suffolk Record Office collects and holds a diverse range of local records, including parish, district, borough and county council records, and information from Suffolk-based authorities and bodies.

Met Office Digital Library and Archive

In recent years, the National Meteorological Library and Archive (NMLA) have been working towards a new archiving capability that provides a safe and secure repository for their digital library and archive collections. Digital preservation lies at the heart of this archive, which means that the Met Office are able to protect and preserve their digital content for the long-term.

The University of Manchester Library

One of only five National Research Libraries in the UK, The University of Manchester Library holds an outstanding collection of rare books, medieval manuscripts, maps and historic archives, which the institution has recently moved to AWS cloud to ensure that its records are safe and accessible for generations to come.

Read more about The University of Manchester Library’s digital preservation programme in TechRadar.

Transport for London

London’s historic transport network, Transport for London (TfL), recently extended its use of the AWS Cloud to protect its archive of London history. The archive contains a complete collection of all transport materials related to the London 2012 Olympic Games, including maps, modelling work and passenger flows. Older material records the city’s social history dating back to the 19th Century, including information on as many as 500,000 staff from 1863 to the end of WWII.

Watch Tamara Thornhill from TfL discuss their digital preservation project in our user group video.

Tweet us @Preservica to let us know what events you’re getting involved in for #explorearchives.

Want to learn more about how Preservica can ensure your digital assets will be safe and accessible for years to come? Get in touch with our team.

Posted by
David Portman
Marketing Programs Manager